Here's Your Sign
Dedicated to hard-working guys who haven't quite gotten it
together: They think they're good, but they might be
somewhat "Aclueistic".
(Gotta know a teacher to  understand that one).
This contractor's provided the two required
safety devices on a zone damper system: The
"Bypass Damper" (center - see the damper
arm and counterweight) and the "Discharge
Sensor" (lower right); these protect the
compressor (and furnace heat exchanger, in
warm air systems) as  system airflow
changes when zone dampers open and close.
Hate to pick nits, guys; BUT the manufacturer of this Bypass Damper says it
won't work in the vertical position (and it wasn't working when we checked).
Did we mention the damper blade won't close tightly because the
counterweight hits the duct? We determined 200 CFM, a half ton of air, was
going from the supply right back to the return and never reaching the
conditioned space.

COME ON UP AND GET YOURS!
Remember back in Flex Duct, ADC cautioned
against sizing flex using metal duct sizing
procedures, and younger viewers said "DUH"?

Here's a 3.5 ton system rated at 1,400 CFM;
16" round metal duct would be fine, BUT 16"
flex is only rated for 850 CFM.
We measured this one and determined actual flow was 1,150 CFM (only
because this furnace has a 3/4 HP motor and a big blower rated for 4 tons of
air), and determined the refrigerant charge had been adjusted to derate the AC
to 3 tons. What began life as a 13 SEER is now a 10 or 11.

You say the electronic air cleaner's wider than the furnace, and you don't have
space for the required transition fitting? No problem - Just tape over the
difference!

WE GOT SIGNS FOR YOU!
Here the 18" flex (OD
about 21") main supply
and the 18" flex main
return cross one
another in a 24" high
space. Normal design
for
properly installed
18" flex is 1,000+ CFM.

This bozo thinks he
can deliver 2,000 CFM
with these restrictions!

HERE'S A BIG ONE
FOR YOU!
Here's a joist bay
used to transport
return air; we don't
like the practice, but
it's "legal".

The hole in the
bottom connects to
the return duct
running perpendicular
to the joists.

What's not here is
something to block off
the bay beyond the
return duct.

There's a second bay
just like this one, and
the furnace is drawing
about a third of the
total airflow from the
unconditioned
basement.

That's a real
expensive proposition
in the winter!

STEP RIGHT UP
HERE!
Manufacturer's Instructions require 24" access
space to work on this heat pump (Keep in mind
there are a relay, a contactor, a reversing valve,
an expansion valve - and oh yes, a compressor
- inside the box).

The company that installed this unit advertises
in the local Yellow Pages for service business.
They set this unit with its access panel facing the wall; there's 6" space between
the unit and the wall (to save a few feet of tubing, no doubt), and it's difficult to
remove the panel, much less work on anything inside.

HERE'S YOURS!

You know....that unit's five tons and the calculated requirement is THREE tons.

HERE'S ONE MORE, YOU REALLY DESERVE IT!
The Right WAY

We've always called
the work performed
a contractor's
"Signature".

This signature
indicates a dedication
to doing the work the
way it should be done:
Note how the access
panel (the corner of
the unit at left) faces
outward. A lesser
contractor would have
rotated the unit 90
degrees CW to save a
few dollars on tubing
and wiring.
Sign #1 goes to the H&AC installer for
running his branch duct through
space needed for the plumbing.

Sign #2 goes to the plumber for his
creative problem solving.

Sign  #3 goes to the builder for his
effectiveness in coordinating
the work of the two trades.

STEP RIGHT UP, GUYS!
For Excellence In Applying Zone Controls
For Excellence
In Duct Design
For Excellence
In Return Air
Runner-Up for Excellence In Duct Design
For Excellence In Service And Repair
For Excellence In Working Together As A Team